Showing posts with label Delhi Government. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Delhi Government. Show all posts

December 7, 2017

Parents in a fix over nursery age limit - Nursery Admissions Delhi 2018-19



The upper age limit, set to be implemented from this nursery admission session, has left parents in a fix. While some are planning to move to NCR, where the schools have relaxed age norms, the others are still weighing their options.

Rida Sadiq, mother of a four-year-old, is planning to move to Noida. She sat out the admissions last year because, at three years and one month, she thought her son was too young for school. "I did not want to burden him with any academic pressure and was planning to get him admitted this year. But now he will be a month too old for nursery," she said.

The decision by the Delhi government to implement the upper age limit at entry-level classes this year, has now left Sadia considering other 'options'. "There are schools in Noida that has relaxed age limits," she said.
Several parents shared Sadiq's concern. Those who waited last year for the child to grow would now have to consider skipping nursery and moving to KG, because their kids surpass the nursery cutoff age by a month or so.

Sonia Dhawan, mother of a three-year-old, regrets having let go of the admission season last year, after the "school was not as per her choice". "My daughter will be youngest in the class at three years and one month, if admitted last year. I decided to wait for a year. But this March 31, she will be four years and one month and so ineligible," she said.

Though getting the child admitted in KG, that take students between 4 and 5 years, is an option, Dhawan is not satisfied. "She will still remain the youngest in the class. Kids find it difficult to cope and it takes a hit on their self-esteem," she said.

Nevata Gupta claimed that late bloomers don't fare well in groups of older peers. "I had a relative whose child was a late bloomer. They put him in school where he was among the youngest, and now he is struggling to cope," she said. Her son, too, hasn't started speaking yet. He would be 3 years and 3 months on March 31, 2018. "I don't want to put him in school just yet. But next year, if the upper age limit stays, then I won't have much flexibility in choice of schools," she complained.

source: timesofindia.indiatimes.com

November 20, 2017

Delhi Government issues 117-point checklist

The Delhi government has issued schools a 117-point checklist for ensuring student safety in their premises and warned that there would be "zero tolerance" for any violation.     
The checklist, including everything from toilets to cyber security, has been prepared in the wake of the brutal killing of a schoolboy in a Gurgaon school and the rape of a minor girl by a school attendant in Delhi, officials said.     
"The checklist has been designed to encapsulate the minimum standards of school safety to emphasize zero tolerance against any violation in this regard. The practicability of implementation and monitoring has been kept duly in mind," a senior official of Directorate of Education (DoE) said.     
Among the points listed are school safety committees, monthly safety walks to identify loopholes in security in the premises, securing boundary walls with grills, CCTV surveillance, maintaining records of every entry into the school and restricting visitors.     
"All toilets should be well lit and have easy release lock from inside and no lock from outside. There should be no deployment of male staff in toilets for primary classes and all toilet visits of students up to Class 2 should be surpervised by a lady caretaker," the guidelines state.     
The guidelines have been issued to all schools in the national capital.     
The government has also directed that prior written consent be sought from parents for allowing children to stay back post school hours and co-curricular activities held beyond school timings be supervised by at least two teachers.     
Visits to laboratories, sports room, auditorium, library, computer room, gymnasium and assembly hall and the like should be under direct supervision of relevant teachers.     
Schools have also been asked to ensure cyber security in accordance with existing cyber and IT laws. This includes installation of firewall, filtering and monitoring mechanisms in all computers in the school premises, regular review of filtering and blocking policies and procedure and ensuring that children use computers under the supervision of teachers.

source: newindianexpress.com

November 7, 2017

The admission schedule for Nursery Admissions Delhi for session 2018-19 is expected to be issued by early December.

Delhi govt unlikely to change rules for admission to nursery class

The Delhi government is not likely to make changes to the rules for nursery admissions in the next academic session, allowing each private school to finalize guidelines on its own, officials in the state education department said on Monday.
The admission schedule for over 1,700 recognized private unaided schools, which offer approximately 1.25 lakh seats in nursery every year, is expected to be issued by early December.
Government officials said the decision not to intervene would avoid potential legal challenges, which have usually followed alterations to guidelines and prolonged the admission process in previous years.
“This time, we want to bring the admission schedule for all private unaided schools at one go. There will be no different guidelines or schedules issued for schools on government land. Schools will decide their own criteria,” a top official in the Delhi education department told Hindustan Times.
In January this year, the Delhi government issued a notification asking 298 top schools built on Delhi Development Authority land to make residential proximity the primary criterion for new admissions.
According to the notification, applicants living within one kilometer of the school would be given preference. If there were seats left, admissions would be given to applicants living between one and three kilometers of the school, and if the seats were still not filled, to students living between three and six kilometers of the school. The guidelines also abolished the management quota in these schools.
The notification was immediately challenged by the association for private schools on the grounds that it violated their autonomy. The Delhi high court ordered a stay, but the confusion lingered for weeks. The application process, which was to finish in January, was finally completed in mid-February.
The case is still in court and the next date of hearing has been set for January 16, 2018.
The high court also told the government to make any changes in the guidelines for the next session at least three months before admissions were schedule to begin. That deadline has passed.
When told that the government was not likely to intervene this year, SK Bhattacharya, president of the Action Committee for Unaided Recognised Private School, said his body would welcome the move.
“The government needs to keep a balance between autonomy of private schools and transparency. If this is happening, it will ensure parents don’t face any confusion due to last minute changes.”
As things stand, residential proximity to the school carries the highest weight for new admissions to most institutions. The radius, however, varies from school to school. Other criteria include preference for girls, for candidates who have siblings in the same school, for children of alumni, and for students with a single parent. A total of 100 points are divided between these criteria in different proportions.
A Delhi government official said that the education department would meet over the next two days to finalize the admission schedule.
Even if no changes are made to guidelines, the official stressed, all schools will have to abide by an earlier government order that abolished 51 admission criteria considered “discriminatory”. These included oral tests, interviews, achievements of parents, non-smoking parents, and vegetarian parents.

source: hindustantimes.com

August 17, 2017

Delhi Govt Threatens To Take Over Modern School, DPS Among Others If They Fail To Refund 'Excess Fee'



The Delhi government told the Delhi High Court that it was ready to take over the management of 449 private schools in the city. These schools, the government alleged, have failed to follow the recommendations of the Justice Anil Dev Singh Committee and refund the 'excess fees' they had charged to the parents of the pupils.

The Directorate of Education filed an affidavit at the Delhi High Court saying the government has sent show cause notices to these schools. The schools are required to come up with a satisfactory response within two weeks, else, the government will take over the management of these schools.

Hindustan Times quotes from the affidavit: "The department has already processed the proposal to issue show cause notices for taking over the management of schools under section 20 read with section 24(4)(c) of the Delhi School Education Act, 2009 and placed it before the Lieutenant Governor, being the competent authority, for approval...."

The Justice Anil Dev Singh Committee For Review Of School Fee was set up following directions of the Delhi High Court. The committee was supposed to review fee structures of schools in Delhi and came out with a series of interim reports in 2016. In a couple of these reports, the committee had suggested that schools return the excess fees they had charged to the parents with a 9 percent interest on the amount.

The Indian Express reports: "Of the 544 schools, 469 were asked to refund the money while 75 schools were inspected and then asked to refund the money. Sixty-seven schools challenged the committee's recommendations, of which 17 cases are being heard in court."

The article states that the government made this move after a Delhi-based NGO filed a petition alleging that the Directorate of Education has failed to implement the recommendations of the committee.

The Times of India reports that among the schools the government intends to take over, some are the popular ones where the city's rich and the famous like sending their children to. "The list of 449 schools furnished to the court includes the names of DPS (Mathura Road), Springdales (Pusa Road), Sanskriti, Modern (Barakhamba Road) and Amity International (Saket)," the report states.

AAP's Atishi Marlena, advisor to education minister Manish Sisodia, told The Indian Express that they have already sent a file comprising their proposal for clearance to the lieutenant-governor Anil Baijal and had no option because the schools were refusing to fall in line.

The Delhi HC, The Times of India reports, however, wasn't exactly amused by the government's proposal. One of the concerns they raised about the government's proposal was whether the Directorate of Education had even a handful of people skilled and trained to run school management bodies. If it didn't, how did it plan to execute this 'take-over' of more than 400 schools?

A bench comprising Justices Siddharth Mridul and Najmi Waziri wondered aloud if the government was pulling a 'bluff' or was genuinely interested in the issue.


source: huffingtonpost.in
timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/will-take-over-449-private-schools-delhi-govt-tells-hc/articleshow/60094152.cms
indianexpress.com/article/education/can-take-over-pvt-schools-that-havent-refunded-excess-fee-says-delhi-govt-4800151/
hindustantimes.com/delhi-news/delhi-govt-proposes-taking-over-449-private-schools-over-fee-refund/story-GdUQGweV5MtpK9dfnQoI4J.html

May 18, 2017

HINDI MEDIUM, a movie that takes a dig at education system - Nursery Admissions Delhi-NCR

The film shows the plight of parents struggling to get a nursery seat for their child.



If you are a parent living in Delhi who has fought a battle of nursery admission or is a parent who would do that in near future, the film Hindi Medium is your story. Having covered the nursery admissions in the last one decade as a journalist and now a parent myself, I can say that getting a nursery seat is a herculean task in Delhi. The film shows the real-life experiences of parents and the problems thousands of them face every year, with a dash of humour.

Illustration: Ashish Asthana

The film, starring Irrfan Khan and Pakistani actress Saba Qamar, shows the plight of parents who aspire to send their daughter to an English medium school. Probably the first film made to highlight the flaws of education system, it points out at the need to reform the education system. It shows that education, which is supposed to be a not-for-profit activity and right of every child, has emerged as a big business opportunity. 

While the film will release on May 19, a screening was organized on May 13 for deputy chief minister of Delhi Manish Sisodia, who handles the education portfolio, and the department of education. 

The government-run schools across India are in bad shape. Shortage of classrooms, insufficient teachers and low learning levels are some of the problems they have faced over the years. They have been left to decay for a long time. It is because of the poor standards of such schools that parents have shifted to private schools. 

More children and less number of good quality private schools; the nursery admission blues has become an annual problem since the private schools got autonomy. And it has become challenging for parents to score a seat for their child in the city.

The film is about a couple who dream to give the best education to their daughter and the problems they face. Irrfan Khan portrays the role of a father with a daunting task in hand. A businessman from Chandni Chowk in central Delhi, he wants his daughter to get admission in areputed school in Delhi. He is ready to do anything. From changing house and moving to a posh neighbourhood in south Delhi to come within the 3 km radius of the school, to bribing the school principal and asking an MLA for help, he leaves no stone unturned. The couple also hire a consultant for this. But still do not manage to get admission. Meanwhile, his worker’s son gets admission in a reputed school under the quota reserved for economically weaker section (EWS). When all other means fail, he decides to take the EWS route. 

The film highlights the pressure build up on children to speak in English and how education is creating a divide within the society. It also points out at the increasing ambition of parents from EWS to send their children in English medium schools. The RTE Act mandates reserving 25 percent seats for such children, but corruption and scams act as roadblocks. Manish Sisodia said that the film has shown the reality and that is why the government of Delhi is working hard to solve the problem. He said there is a need to focus on the quality of government school education and the government must develop a strong alternative to private schools. “Improving the system is a complex issue, but the work has already been started.” He added that the stigma attached to the government school will take time to go. “Private schools have become really powerful. They do whatever they wish to. And whenever we pass any regulation, they pressurize and corrupt the system. I don’t think by bringing more strict rules and regulation we can really solve this problem. The solution lies in fixing the problem with government schools. We are working to bring the government schools at par with the private schools by improving their quality. If people are confident about government schools, then only this problem can be solved.” Sisodia said that government schools have been left to decay for around 25 years and thus, cannot be improved overnight. “For the last two years we have been improving the quality of government schools. The confidence of people is increasing now. And it will take some time to change the perception of government schools.” The education minister also said that the government is working to bring strict rules and regulations to ensure there is enough transparency in the system. “There are laws which favor private schools. 

 Atishi Marlena, advisor to Manish Sisodia, also attended the screening. She said that the film is excellent portrayal of the education crisis in Delhi. “We know the problem when it comes to nursery admission. We know many scams happen in the EWS admission in the private schools. There is a demand and supply problem. There are very few high quality schools. And I think eventually the answer is to improve government schools.” Marlena also said that the government is working to make the process of nursery admission in private schools more transparent, and also improving the quality of government schools is the way ahead.

Source : www.governancenow.com

May 4, 2017

Delhi govt raises upper age limit for EWS nursery admissions - Nursery Admission Delhi



The Delhi government raised the upper age limit for admission to entry-level classes under the Economically Weaker Section (EWS) and Disadvantaged Group (DG) category, by an year.

The Delhi government on Wednesday raised the upper age limit for admission to entry-level classes under the Economically Weaker Section (EWS) and Disadvantaged Group (DG) category, by an year.

The government had in 2015 fixed upper age limit for admissions to pre-school (nursery), pre-primary (KG) and class I as 4 years, 5 years and 6 years, respectively.

However, now the Directorate of Education (DoE) has raised it to 5 years, 6 years and 7 years, respectively and directed the schools to apply the new age limit for the admissions to 2017-18 academic session as well.

"The age for granting admission to the students at entry level classes for the academic year 2017- 18 under EWS/DG category already selected through draw of lots is raised up to one year," a communication sent to schools by DoE read.

"All the private schools are hereby directed to comply with the order accordingly and grant the admission to all such student selected under EWS/DG through computerised draw of lots in the school allotted to them by May 15," it added.

As the Delhi High Court had in 2016 ordered a stay on the earlier age limit, the government had not announced any upper age limit for the admissions under the two categories for this academic session.

"Since no upper age was fixed for the admission in entry level classes under the two categories, the children older than the minimum age for admission were also selected among these 31,269 children," the DoE communication said.

Delhi High Court had last week ordered the government to raise the upper age limit as an interim measure and proceed with the admissions.

A total of 1,13,991 students applied for the admission in the entry-level classes and 31,269 students got selected through computerised lots of draw.
source: zeenews.india.com

March 18, 2017

VIRAL & BREAKING: How fake 'crisis' created by nursery admissions forums lead to panic situation in Delhi

We first published this news (via HT), on 3rd March that announced that Delhi parents are reaching out to Gurugram schools for admissions as Nursery Admissions in Delhi continues to haunt poor parents that are once again left clueless, and looking for answers to same age old questions once again.

HERE IS THE INSIDE STORY!

Many parents have started blocking seats in NCR schools as there is lot of misleading information being provided on many leading online forums/sites creating panic situation and these sites are actually promoting some leading schools (so called international schools, full A/C schools, hat-ke schools etc - you know what I mean here), as a result they are creating panic so that they can sell seats in those schools in Gurugram, Noida, Faridabad and specially parents that are ready to shell out money as that puts them in more comfortable position by securing seats but hardly helpful.

It is all about money, a nexus and nursery admissions mafia in making :)

Many online sites and forums are misleading parents by re-publishing information that contradicts with reality on ground, and with parents locked in three way battle among - Schools <> DOE/Govt <> Court - these forums are doing further damage by confusing parents, and diverting them to NCR schools that are always on hunt for upper middle or higher class parents that are always on hunt for comfort zone.

It is pain but parents are advised to rather look for information with schools (the best source actually), as many online forums have incomplete, outdated information. Media hardly validates information themselves and falls pray to these fake admissions gurus assuming they know it all - they are actually in the hands of nexus, who is diverting their attention and actually multiplying panic their benefit.

March 5, 2017

Now Open - Admission in Govt. Schools Across Delhi - Nursery Admissions 2017-2018

Nursery Admissions 2017-18
for Nursery / KG / 1st in 150 Sarvodaya Vidyalaya Schools

If you already know how to apply online, please click here to go to the online admission form for admissions in Govt Schools for Nursery Admissions 2017-2018

Click here to got to DOE website to find out more and apply:


January 1, 2017

3 mistakes that DOE/Delhi Govt could have avoided - and they did it again!? Check out...

It is not rocket science and even if it would have been that complex, don't they have required resources, or support, or authority to get it done?



Parents are clueless and left to wonder, grin, and helpless once again! Nothing new in year 2017, yet again, and history repeats as schools continue to play by their own rules, and parents shall expect that those 1400 odd schools that free to choose their own criteria have no motivation or support or govt. control to relax it from what they did last year.

Here are the top 3 gross and silly mistakes that could have been avoided and it is not rocket science -

Mistake #1) DOE should have asked schools (all schools that need to publish points) to list and publish selection criteria and points by 15th December, so that parents get enough lead time (15 days) to shortlist schools they would like to apply (basis total points they are scoring).
Reality check: 
1) Guidelines for admissions to Govt schools and 298 schools on DDA land are not published as yet, admission starts tomorrow.
2) Parents would now have wait and/or to go to all schools and check the guidelines, criteria and other details starting tomorrow and that's not an easy task.

Mistake #2) DOE/Govt should have defined a fixed list of criteria that schools can choose from (say 5-8 criteria), e.g. Neighborhood (with clear and predefined distance slabs),  Sibling, Alumni, Girl Child, and so on. 

Reality check:
1) Although DOE has asked schools not to use ones from 62 list, but....schools are free to use some of them as long as they "try" to ensure it is defined well and is not biased. You know what I mean....
2) Parents struggled over years to sync up same criteria being used by different schools differently e.g. Distance slabs would vary from school to school), Alumni - mother and father and both would be rated by schools differently and there are many more...

Mistake #3) Despite of all resources available, the DOE site doesnt work properly, the information published is scattered all over the place, you really need surgical eyes and hands to find the links and information.

Reality check:
1) No summary of notices, information available, its all published in long PDFs and report formats that's hard to understand and an 'aam aadmi'. Many parents would have appreciated if the information is also available in Hindi
2)  No reliable search feature on site, no heads up on how and where the information will be published on DOE site, its all "treasure hunt" games for parents.

(Updated on 2nd Jan 2017: SchoolsWeLike.com has come up with Search Engine on data provided by DOE to make it easy for parents to search the school criteria and points for Nursery Admissions 2017-2018)

----------------------------------------------------

The list is long, all I wanted to reflect here is this is all easy to implement - we are in 2017 (oh! Happy Near Year friends! :D)

The problem can be fixed this within short span of timehrs, as techie I know it is easy as long as you got data in right form and shape which I hope they have and if not, please add that as Mistake#4 :)

Wish you all a fresh beginning here and may your ward gets admission to the school you desire him/her to go to. 

December 20, 2016

Nursery admissions to begin from Jan 2 in 1,400 Delhi schools


Nursery admissions will begin from January 2, 2017, in around 1,400 private unaided recognized schools in the capital for the next academic session but this announcement does not cover the 285 schools build on DDA land as there will be separate guidelines and schedule for them.

The Directorate of Education (DOE) on Monday announced the admission schedule for around 1,400 schools, out of the total 1,700 schools. Admission forms will be available from January 2 and the last date of submission of application forms is January 23, officials said.

These schools will be free to decide the criteria and its points for admission but they will have to steer clear from a list of 51 criterions, which the government had abolished last year.

The abolished criteria include, parent’s education, parent’s profession, age, oral test and interview.

“The admission process for general category seats will begin from January 2. Schools can decide pointers for the criteria but they cannot adopt 51 listed criteria that have been abolished by the government,” officials said.

DOE said that separate guidelines and schedule for 285 schools on DDA land given on lease condition will be announced later. The government had earlier announced that schools build on DDA land will have to follow only the distance criterion.

“The above guidelines and schedule is not applicable for the schools running on the land allotted by DDA on the condition that ‘the school shall not refuse admission to the resident of the locality’ or ‘the society shall undertake to admit 75% of the students of the neighbourhood or from the locality in which the school is located’,” DOE said on Monday.

The first list of selected candidates, including the wait list candidates, along with marks allotted under point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. After the first list is out, the parents can get their doubts resolved about allocation of points or any other queries related to the admission procedure for three days, i.e. February 16, 17, and 18.

“The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31,” DOE said in its notification.


DOE said that the minimum age should be 3 years by March 31 of the year in which admission is being sought. It also said that the number of seats at the entry level shall not be less than the highest number of seats in entry level classes during last three years.


The documents that can be considered as proof of residence of parents are, ration card issued in the name of parents, domicile certificate of child or his/her parents, voter ID card of any of the parent.

AT A GLANCE

1. School to upload criteria and their points on DOE wesbite: Jan 1

2. Application forms to be available: Jan 2

3. Last date of submission of application forms: Jan 23

4. Schools to upload marks (as per point system) given to each applicant: Feb 6

5. Schools to announce first list of selected candidates: Feb 15

6. Schools to announce second list of selected candidates: Feb 29

7. Closure of admission Process: March 31







source: www.hindustantimes.com/














February 11, 2016

AAP government takes baby steps to revamp education sector...

A dilapidated building with fans ready to fall off, broken switchboards, and rickety desks and chairs has become synonymous with government-run model schools in Delhi.
Of the at least 957 schools in dire need of attention, only 54 have been selected for infrastructure improvements. However, the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government says it is working to improve the sorry situation and fulfil its promise made during the election campaign.
A 106% increase in the allocation of funds for education in the last budget should ensure there is no paucity of funds.
“By the end of the year, the model schools would be ready. We have been told that once this set is corrected there would be a trickledown effect and help in improving other schools,” said BK Sharma, principal of Shaheed Hemu Kalani Sarvodaya Bal Vidyalaya in Lajpat Nagar II.
However, the absence of 500 new schools and 20 new colleges — as promised before a fledgling AAP stormed into power last year — will continue to be a sore spot for the state government.
It is not that the government isn’t working towards it — construction of 25 new schools and 8,000 additional rooms at existing schools has started and is expected to be completed by 2016-17, but the numbers lag behind target.
“In one year, 25 new schools... (are) still being constructed. The government should know that they just have four years left now. Next election is going to depend on fulfilled promises,” said Amar Singh, an auto rickshaw driver.
But the government remains optimistic.
“Improving the infrastructure was necessary but it is not sufficient. Henceforth, focus would be on improving quality — by capacity-building of teachers, competency-based learning, providing onsite support and improving learning levels in children,” said Atishi Marlena, special adviser to the state education minister.
Educationists feel this is not right approach to improve the quality of education.
“I have seen the way learning levels of Class 9 students were tested. By asking basic mathematics questions on division, different levels of children have been decided. Such division is completely undemocratic and discriminatory. Consulting organisations like Teach for India for improving schools is not going to help,” said Anita Rampal, an educationalist.
Another point of contention is the government’s proposal to scrap the no-detention policy — where a student cannot be held back in the same class even if he fails an exam.
Nonetheless, the slew of bills to improve the education sector, including the Fee Regulation Bill and amendment to the Delhi Education Bill to bring transparency to nursery admission, are being touted as “AAP’s education revolution”.
The state is also expected to move forward with its plan to do away with management quota in public schools — after failing with private schools, which moved court and the order was quashed.
The first year in office for the AAP has largely been about transforming primary education in Delhi, but the challenge ahead will be secondary education.
The government successfully launched the Delhi Education Guarantee Scheme — under which loans guaranteed by the state are provided to students for higher education — and will be looking to find a viable way to introduce double-shifts in Delhi University colleges to deal with the increasing number of students.
“Our focus is now also more towards skill development and building a sports university,” said Marlena.

source: www.hindustantimes.com

February 10, 2016

Management quota inherently prone to misuse, says Delhi Govt to HC



The Delhi government today told the High Court that management quota for nursery admission in private schools was “inherently prone to misuse”, which led it to step in and scrap it.

The submission was made in response to a query by a bench of Chief Justice G Rohini and Justice Jayant Nath as to how private unaided schools can be restrained from exercising management quota when they are entitled to it under a 2007 order of Lt Governor.

“When there is something inherently prone to misuse, state as regulator can say don’t do it. Management quota is a criterion which is prone to misuse,” the Delhi government said on the issue.

The private unaided schools, on the other hand, contended that the Delhi government’s January 6 order scrapping various criteria and the management quota was not issued by the LG or under any statute and “ran foul” of the LG’s 2007 order.

After hearing arguments of both sides, the bench reserved its verdict on the government’s plea challenging a single judge order of the high court staying the scrapping of the management quota and certain other criteria for nursery admissions in private unaided schools. While reserving its verdict, the court observed that due to shortage of good schools in Delhi, people were being forced to go to Noida where it was easier to get admission. During the hearing, the court said the government would have to show that private unaided schools were indulging in commercialization and profiteering by way of the management quota and asked, “where is the basis for such allegation?” The government said it has received complaints from lot of parents that some schools have demanded capitation fees and added that these were placed before the single-judge who in turn asked the government to take action. Read: Fossil fuel is waste we throw out of our house: J&K science teacher It said it has issued show cause notices to some schools which had indulged in such activity. The government also contended that the 2007 order was not etched in stone to make it insurmountable for all times to come. It alleged that there were “inherent contradictions” in the entire approach of the single-judge who had passed the February 4 interim order in which he had also given a prima facie view that the January 6 decision was taken without any authority of law. The government has contended that its January 6 order “was validly and lawfully” issued and it superseded the 2007 order. It also claimed that the decision was taken “without any view to interfering in autonomy of private unaided schools”. It said the “objective was not to deprive private unaided schools of autonomy, but to ensure that admission to entry level classes are made in a fair, reasonable, rational, transparent and non-exploitative manner.” The Directorate of Education (DoE) of the government in its plea has said it was “fully empowered and competent in terms of Delhi Schools Education Act and Rules framed thereunder to issue” the January 6 order. These contentions and claims were opposed by the private schools during the hearing. Read: 10 tips and tricks to prepare for entrance exams The single-judge in his February 4 interim order was of the prima facie view that Delhi government’s January 6 order, scrapping a total of 62 criteria and management quota, was “issued without any authority” and in “direct conflict” with the LG’s 2007 order on nursery admissions in private schools. On the issue of management quota, the court had said the high court-appointed Ganguly committee and the government had done a balancing act by agreeing that the 100 per cent discretion enjoyed by private schools in admissions was minimized, but not abolished. The government, in its appeal, has said the issue of management quota “needs to be approached differently than as recommended by the Ganguly committee” in view of the “change in time and subsequent experiences”. The single judge had also observed that “promoters of a school who make investment at their own personal risk are entitled to full autonomy in administration including the right to admit students.” The order had come on the pleas filed by Action Committee of Unaided Recognized Private Schools and Forum for Promotion of Quality Education For All, seeking quashing of the DoE’s January 6 order.

source:indianexpress.com

January 22, 2016

Nursery Admissions: Delhi High Court issues notice to Kejriwal govt....seeks reply from Kejriwal govt over management quota row


With regard to the Delhi High Court's move to issue notice to the government in connection with scrapping of management quota, the association of private schools said that the quota should not be scrapped as schools need to "oblige" people.
"Those people (government) who can't administer a public school are trying to take over admissions of private schools", the HC said reprimanding the AAP government and censured the government for its failure to improve the condition of public schools.
Meanwhile, Delhi government's additional standing counsel Gautam Narayan told the court there cannot be any such quota and "it has to go". Apparently, the government believes that schools have taken advantage of their discretionary powers. "There is rush in private schools because the standard is not good in public schools". When can't you improve public schools? You are taking over private schools. No one is addressing that issue. "Set your house in order".
It clarified that that parents may apply now but the scrutiny of applications would be subject to final orders in the petitions by Forum for Promotion of Quality Education and Action Committee of Unaided Recognized Private Schools. The SC had recognized the right of the private schools to have maximum autonomy in admissions and to set a fee structure.
Private schools had argued that the orders passed by Arvind Kejriwal-led government stating that it is contrary to and violates the judgements of the Supreme Court and High Court and affects the autonomy of private unaided schools to regulate their admissions.
He said the existing provision of 25 percent seats earmarked for students from poor families will remain in place.
"However, respondent no. 4 (Sanskriti) in sheer defiance of the circulars has not uploaded the admission criteria and points for admissions of open seats at entry level classes for the academic session 2016-17", a petition filed by a toddler's father, advocate Dheeraj Singh, has said.
Lt. Governor Najeeb Jung had in December 2013 issued a notification abolishing management quota in nursery admissions but this was challenged by the affected schools.
Earlier, the high court, in an order, had asked the Delhi government not to micro-manage the admission process following which Education Department had allowed the schools to frame their respective criteria and put them on their websites.

source: theindianrepublic.com

January 19, 2016

Sanskriti School can’t keep admission process pending indefinitely:High Court to school


Delhi High Court today told the Sanskriti School here that it cannot keep its admission process pending “indefinitely” on the ground that its plea against quashing of 60 per cent quota forwards of group-A government officials was pending in the Supreme Court.

“You have to comply with the circulars of Department of Education (DoE). You can’t keep it pending indefinitely,” Justice Manmohan told the lawyer appearing for the school.

However, the court did not issue any directions on those lines and adjourned the matter to January 20, as the school’s special leave petition against high court’s November 6, 2015, order scrapping its 60 per cent quota is listed for hearing in the apex court tomorrow.

Justice Manmohan asked the school’s lawyer to inform the apex court about this petition as well.

Meanwhile, Delhi government’s additional standing counsel Gautam Narayan told the court there cannot be any such quota and “it has to go”.

Narayan also said the school cannot have its way and refuse to put up the nursery admission criteria for academic session 2016-17 on their website.

He said the school should comply with DoE’s circulars of December 8, 2015 and December 22, 2015 which mandate that the admission process should commence from January 1 and fix the last date for application as January 22.

The January 6 order asks schools “to develop and adopt criteria for admissions to the 75 per cent open seats to entry level classes for session 2016-17 which shall be well defined, non-discriminatory, unambiguous and transparent”. “However, Respondent no.4 (Sanskriti) in sheer defiance of the circulars has not uploaded the admission criteria and points for admissions of open seats at entry level classes for the academic session 2016-17,” a petition filed by a toddler’s father, advocate Dheeraj Singh, has said. The petition has sought directions to the government and DoE to ensure that the school puts up the admission criteria before the last date of application. It has also sought that DoE should take over the management of the school if it does not comply with the circulars and order. The high court had on November 6 last year quashed the 60 per cent quota in Sanskriti School, saying it was akin to the erstwhile segregation of white and black students in the US and violated the constitutional provisions of equality and right to education. It had also said that by providing such a reservation, the school created an “arbitrary separation” between the children of Group-A officers and all other students. The decision was challenged by the school in a special leave petition before the apex court. On January 7, the central government had told the apex court that wards of group B and C government employees can also be provided admission under the 60 per cent quota. The apex court has listed the matter on January 19 for passing an interim order after the government and Sanskriti sought that the school be allowed to carry out admission process under the earlier system.

source: indianexpress.com

January 10, 2016

50 per cent extra seats opened up after abolition of management quota: Arvind Kejriwal



Scrapping of management quota for nursery admissions in private schools has thrown open 50 per cent extra seats for common man, Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Sunday said, even as he asserted that the government had no intention of “interfering” into the daily affairs of
the schools.

The chief minister also said that the Delhi government will “think” about online admissions on 75 per cent open seats in the next year.

“The Delhi government has made school admissions totally transparent. Scrapping management quota, which were used to oblige recommendations of politicians, government functionaries and powerful people, has opened nearly 50 per cent extra seats for common man,” Kejriwal said at an interaction with parents seeking admission for their wards.

The government has “cut its own hands” in doing so as the school admission process will now take place in a transparent manner without any recommendations, he said.

“We are not going to benefit from it and the government and the chief minister have rather cut our hands otherwise our volunteers would bring recommendations and we would be doling out seats for admissions,” he said.

Replying to complaints and suggestions of parents seeking admission for their children, Kejriwal said the management quota and 62 criteria for admissions were scrapped as they were not “reasonable, fair and transparent”.

“We believed in schools and allowed them to upload their admission criteria by December 31. But some of the schools betrayed our faith and reserved upto 75 per cent seats through these criteria and various quota like alumni and sibling quota.”

The chief minister said that the admissions on 25 per cent seats under EWS quota were also riddled with irregularities and the government has now made this process online.

“They will have no better government than this one if they want to do good things but they will also not found any worse government if they indulge in irregularities,” he warned.

“Now, the schools will not have their say in it. Those who will not follow guidelines and rules will be decrecognised,” Kejriwal said, adding that his government had no intention of “interfering” in their day to day affairs.

“We will think about online admissions on 75 per cent open seats in the next year,” he said in reply to a suggestion by one of the parents.

The government has decided to focus on education and health in 2016 and is working on it, the Chief Minister said adding that policies should be framed in consultation with public, he said.

Attending the event, Deputy CM and Education minister Manish Sisodia said, “There was tremendous pressure from different quarters including the private schools to maintain the management quota. But we will not bow down to pressure,” he said.

The government has only “ordinary” powers to regulate schools and it needs to have more powers to issue directions and take action against them.

“We have included this power in Delhi Education Act by amending it and sent for approval of Centre so that so that Delhi government and private schools in Delhi could work in a better way,” he said.

Alleging that several schools had turned themselves into “teaching shops” through management quota, Sisodia said that the government was determined to stop them.

“Management quotas were used as a window through which money was taken and recommendations by ministers, bureaucrats and police officials were met,” he said.

The schools are creating “confusion” over admission criteria and ending of management quota, but the parents need not to worry as the government was with them, Sisodia said.

“The schools are doing this wilfully to scare the parents. But they do not need to worry as the government is with them to ensure transparency in admission,” he said.

The Deputy Chief Minister, while criticising the private schools over management quota and admission criteria related irregularities, also acknowledged their role in “maintaining quality of education” at a time when government schools failed to do so.

“They have been told that if they face legal problems in the way of doing good things we will change it.”

He further clarified that the government has accepted the demand of private schools for seats for children of teachers and members of management committees.

Asserting that improvement in education required efforts on all its aspects, Sisodia said that the government will focus on training and quality of education at government schools.

source: indianexpress.com

January 7, 2016

Kejriwal bouncer for private schools....

Delhi govt scraps all quotas except EWS for nursery admissions

In yet another shocker to private schools, the Delhi government on Wednesday scrapped all quotas except the Economically Weaker Sections (EWS) for nursery admissions.

The decision was announced in a state cabinet meeting where Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal called the 'management quota' the breeding ground for biggest scandals in the education sector in the country and said that his government will not be a mute spectator to it.

The state government also made some stark changes in admission guidelines for private school in December last year.

"What is management quota? Under it, you get admission if someone is recommended by a chief minister, education minister, judge, police commissioner, SHOs or by an income tax official. Either it is a recommendation or seats are sold. Management quota is the biggest scandal in the country which the Delhi Government is scrapping. 75 per cent admissions in private schools will be under open category. Other than EWS category, there will be no other quota," Kejriwal announced.

The government also scrapped 62 arbitrary and discriminatory admission criteria listed by schools on their websites. The decision came in the midst of the ongoing admission process for nursery classes in over 2,500 private institutions in the Capital.

Warning schools of stringent action, Kejriwal said the government will use all available options against erring institutions, including takeovers. "If they do not budge, they can be derecognised or government can take them over," he said.

Private schools in Delhi have quotas for management, siblings, alumni and many others. The decision also prohibits schools from making parents declare details like whether they smoke or drink or consume non-vegetarian food. "The government will not tolerate this. The idea is to make the admission process pro-people and transparent," Education Minister Manish Sisodia said.

The HC, in an order, had asked the Delhi government not to micro-manage the admission process following which the education department had allowed schools to frame their respective criteria and put them on their websites. Kejriwal said certain criteria put out by schools were very shocking and in violation of Article 14 of the Constitution relating to equality before law. "The education department officials told me that court has directed not to micro-manage the admission process. I told them not to worry. Tell the court that I have done this. I will tell the court that management quota is the biggest scandal and this should be stopped. And now the cabinet has given its approval," said Kejriwal.

However, school associations which had moved court in 2014 after Lieutenant Governor Najeeb Jung had notified the scrapping of quotas, claimed the matter is still pending and hence the announcement amounts to contempt of court. There was a judgment by a single bench of high court granting autonomy to schools for deciding quotas.

"The government had challenged the judgment seeking a stay before a double bench but the matter is still pending. Such an announcement at this stage when the matter is sub-judice amounts to contempt of court," said SK Bhattacharya, President of Action Committee for Unaided Private Schools, which has 400 schools registered under it.

"Also, management quota is not just a brainchild of private schools but also of the Justice Ganguly Committee who had also supported the issue. The tearing hurry in which the cabinet has taken this decision is not understandable," Bhattacharya added.

Private schools in Delhi adopted a cautious approach in reacting to Delhi government's decision of scrapping the management quota for nursery admissions even as various associations of unaided private schools reacted strongly saying the move is an attack on the schools' autonomy.

Ashok Sehgal, Principal, Ahlcon International School and Chairman, National Progressive Schools Conference (NPSC) said, "After schools went to high court and it ruled in favour of the schools and connotations of it, they challenged it and the matter is pending. Then to bring any order at this stage is surprising especially when the admissions have already begun. It will create further confusion for parents."

source:indiatoday.intoday.in

AAP govt strikes off 62 criteria, management quota in private schools of capital......



The AAP government Wednesday scrapped 62 assessment criteria used by private unaided schools in nursery admissions, terming them ‘arbitrary’ and ‘discriminatory’. The cabinet approved the decision to strike down criteria including economic condition, parent’s profession or area of expertise, regularity in payment of school dues and lifestyle choices of parents like smoking, drinking and eating non-vegetarian food. 
The criteria used by certain schools for nursery admissions were “shocking”, said Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal while explaining the reason behind the government’s move. 

“The Delhi High Court had said in an order that private school admissions cannot be micro-managed by the government… they should have the autonomy to decide the criteria for admission. But the high court had also said that the criteria and the admission process has to be fair, transparent and reasonable,” said Kejriwal. 

“When we saw the criteria put up on the websites of some schools, we were quite shocked. Some schools said that those children whose parents smoke, drink or eat non-veg will not get admission. Others said if parents know how to paint or are trained in music, the child will get extra points. The criteria are so arbitrary and discriminatory,” added the chief minister. 

The government has also decided to do away with all quotas in private school admissions except the 25 per cent reservation for students from economically weaker sections (EWS).

 “Lots of private schools have made terrific reservations. One school has only 25 per cent open seats… 75 per cent of its seats are reserved. There are all kinds of quotas — management quota, sibling quota, this quota and that quota. The court did not allow any quotas. We are opening up 50 per cent more seats for the public. What is this management quota in schools and colleges? References from the chief minister, deputy chief minister, a judge, a station house officer, commissioner of police, income tax department… or they are sold. It is either influence or sale of seats,” said Kejriwal. 

The chief minister said that no school will receive such ‘references’ from any member of his government. 

The Directorate of Education had, in a circular on December 8, 2015, directed all private, unaided and recognised schools to develop and adopt criteria for admissions for the 75 per cent open seats to entry-level classes for 2016-17. The criteria, it stated, should be “clear, well defined, equitable, non-discriminatory, unambiguous and transparent.”

 The process for nursery admissions in various schools started on January 1 and the last date for submitting admission forms is January 22. 

The government examined various admission criteria used by private schools admitting children to entry-level classes and also cited reasons for terming them ‘unjust’. 

Explaining why the criterion about parent’s economic condition was being done away with, the government said, “Parents seeking admission in a particular school are aware of the fee structure of the school and willing to pay the same. The fee structure of the school is same for everyone in the school. So, the economic condition does not matter.” 

On scrapping the criterion about parents’ profession, the government stated, “Parent’s profession should not be a matter for the admission of tiny tots as all children have the same rights.” 

Earlier this week, Transport Minister Gopal Rai had named 283 private schools which, he said, had “cheated’ the Delhi government. They had promised to let their buses be used for public transport during the odd-even operations in Delhi till January 15, but had not kept their pledge, said the minister. 

However, Kejriwal clarified that the decision approved by the Cabinet Wednesday had nothing to do with that. 

Special grounds and why they were removed 

Parents with proficiency in music, sports etc  This criterion is not just as it discriminates against other children seeking admission.

 Parents’ education India is a developing country and literacy rate is not 100 per cent. This is not just towards children whose parents don’t have a good educational background. 

Regularity in payment of school dues This is illogical. Parents seeking admission of their ward cannot be judged on this criterion. 

Both parents are working Equal opportunity should be given to non-working parent/single working parent/both parents working. 

Status of child This is illogical as one can’t assign status to tiny tots. 

First cousin of a student This will create a homogeneous group in a class/school which is not conducive for overall development of child. 

If candidate has proficiency in music and sports It is ridiculous to assign points for proficiency in music and sport to a child between the age of 3 to 6 years. 

Mother’s qualification  Equal opportunities of admission should be given to children irrespective of their mother’s qualification. 

Attitudes and values It is undefined and likely to be misused. 

Old parents  This is illogical and discriminatory. 

Scholar students This is illogical. No scholastic aptitude can be tested at entry-level classes. 

Permanent resident of Delhi by birth  This is illegal and a violation of the fundamental rights of a citizen. 

Similar cultural ethos  This is undefined. 

Joint Family  This criterion is not practically determinable and as such there is no basis of connecting it to the admission process. 

Special quality  This is undefined and likely to be misused. 

Language skills  It is illogical to assign points to this criterion. Small children should be on equal footing in terms of their quality as an entry-level class is the threshold of learning. 

Economic condition  The fee structure of the school is same for everyone, so the economic condition does not matter. 

Parent’s reason for approaching the school  This is undefined and discriminatory.

source: indianexpress.com

January 6, 2016

Management quota scrapped in nursery admissions.....


Arvind Kejriwal said that a major decision has been taken to make the admission process in private schools transparent and pro-people.

In a landmark announcement which will perhaps solve school admission woes in the city, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal today said that a major decision has been taken to make the admission process in private schools transparent and pro-people.

"There will be only 25 per cent of EWS and 75 per cent of seats will have to be made available for general public," Kejriwal said.

Arvind Kejriwal also said that the management quota is a scandal and his government is totally against it. He also said that his government is planning to set up a monitoring committee to keep an eye on private school admissions.

"Management quota is biggest scandal which deprives common people. Delhi government is passing order to abandon management quota. We have scrapped 62 criteria of admission process in private schools that were unreasonable and discriminatory," he said. 


The Aam Aadmi Party had in December 2015 announced that the admissions under the Economically Weaker Sections (EWS) will be online for schools recognised under Delhi School Education Act and Rules (DSEAR), 1973 and offline for schools recognised under the Right to Education (RTE) Act 2009.

source: indiatoday.intoday.in

December 30, 2015

EWS admissions to go online in select schools....

In order to make nursery admissions for the Economically Weaker Section (EWS) fair and unbiased, the Delhi Government has made the procedure centralised from this year.
The government so far was issuing a common form and monitoring the draw-of-lots. The rest of the process used to be managed by the schools, but the process has now been shifted online.
With this, from filling up of forms to submitting of relevant documents and selection of students, everything will be done online. The selection will be done through an online lottery system and schools will be notified about the same.
However, online admission will be accepted only by a select group of schools, to be shortlisted by the Directorate of Education (DoE). Other schools will have a manual draw of lots for selection, just like the previous years. The DoE released an official communication in this regard on Tuesday.
The circular issued by the DoE read: “Admissions of EWS shall be made through computerised lottery system in the said schools against 25 per cent seats reserved for them under the provisions of Right to Education Act, 2009.”
“All the applicants should visit Directorate of Education website www.edudel.nic.in and click the button EWS/DG admissions 2016-17 for detailed information and instructions,” the circular further read.
The confusion between schools that will accept online admissions and the ones that will not is likely to create trouble for the parents, feel experts. “There is a lot of confusion among parents after the circular, as new system is not completely online. The system is not totally computerised and centralised system. It will have online and offline modes for different set of schools,” said Sumit Vohra, who runs a portal on nursery admissions.
Meanwhile, the DoE gave yet another warning to private schools asking them to notify their criteria for nursery admissions. The DoE had asked them to do so by December 31 or face action.
According to the data available with the DoE, 324 of 1737 private schools have not yet notified their criteria despite passing of two deadlines and the Department warning them of strict action.
The nursery admission process in Delhi schools will begin from January 1 and conclude on March 31. While the last date for submitting the applications is January 22, the first list will be out on February 15, followed by another list on February 29.

source: thehindu.com