Showing posts with label admission guidelines. Show all posts
Showing posts with label admission guidelines. Show all posts

December 17, 2017

All You Need to Know : Nursery Admissions 2018-19 (Revised!)

Delhi has over 1700+ Schools, and 1,25,000 Seats are at offer from 1st Jan 2018, for session 2018-2019

Key Updates
(updated on 21st Dec)
  1. Admissions open for Nursery, KG/Pre-Primary, Grade 1 for Session 2018-2019
  2. Age Criteria -
    1. Kids of age 3 years and above will be eligible for Nursery/Pre-School
    2. Kids of age 4 years and above for Pri-Primary/KG
    3. Kids of age 5 years and above for Class 1
  3. Admission Schedule - Want to know important admission dates/schedule? Check "Important Dates - Nursery Admissions 2018-2019" Post.
  4. CLICK HERE to go to POINTS and CRITERIA Search Engine (2018-2019)

WE WILL BE PUBLISHING THE LATEST POINTS/SELECTION CRITERIA for EACH SCHOOL ON OUR PORTAL WWW.SCHOOLSWELIKE.COM  - STAY TUNED!

December 2, 2017

Nursery admission 2018-2019: Admission Process to Begin Soon

Nursery admission 2018-2019: Admission Process to Begin Soon

Seeking admission in Delhi is a challenge and as expected the Nursery Admissions for 2018-2019 Session is expected to start soon.

The process of admissions would start with Admission Forms, that would be available at schools, or on school websites very soon. Govt is determined to streamline the process starting this year by introducing some new guidelines, that would not only help parents but also the schools.

Stay connected to for more realistic views, updates on Nursery Admissions Delhi 2018

August 2, 2017

Navodaya Vidyalaya Delhi - Nursery Admission 2018 Open

राजधानी दिल्ली में एक बार फिर नर्सरी दाखिले की दौड़ शुरू हो गई है। अभिभावकों के पास अपने बच्चों का दाखिला दिलाने के लिए 19 सितंबर तक का मौका है। शिक्षा निदेशालय ने अपने सर्वोदय स्कूलों में नर्सरी से कक्षा पांच तक के लिए दाखिला प्रक्रिया फिर से शुरू कर दी है, जिसके तहत इन कक्षाओं में रिक्त पड़ी सीटों में दाखिला दिया जाएगा।

अभिभावक 19 सितंबर तक स्कूल में जाकर आवेदन कर सकते हैं। निदेशालय के एक अधिकारी ने बताया कि कई सर्वोदय स्कूलों में नर्सरी से 5वीं तक कई सीटें रिक्त हैं। दाखिले के संबंध में संबंधित स्कूलों को निर्देश जारी कर दिए गए हैं।

गौरतलब है कि दिल्ली सरकार के शिक्षा निदेशालय ने इस शैक्षणिक सत्र से ही सर्वोदय स्कूलों में नर्सरी कक्षाएं शुरू की हैं। कुछ स्कूलों की नर्सरी कक्षाओं को दिल्ली सरकार ने निजी स्कूल की तर्ज पर तैयार कराया है।

इन कक्षाओं में दाखिले के लिए निदेशालय ने अप्रैल में ऑनलाइन आवेदन प्रक्रिया शुरू की थी। कंप्यूटर आधारित ड्रॉ के बाद बच्चों को दाखिला दिया गया था।
(source: http://www.jagran.com)

Click on links below for 




February 17, 2017

Delhi government challenges nursery admissions order - Nursery Admissions Delhi 2017-18


The AAP government on Thursday approached the Delhi High Court, challenging a single-judge order that stayed its nursery admissions notification compelling 298 private schools, built on public land, to adopt only neighbourhood criteria.
Filing an appeal before a division bench, Delhi government contended that the single judge was wrong and erroneous and sought setting aside of the February 14 order.
Justice Manmohan in his February 14 order said Delhi government’s January 7 notification was “arbitrary and discriminatory”.
The notification issued by the Department of Education of Delhi government had made “distance” the primary criterion for admission of tiny tots.
The court had questioned the Delhi government’s decision to impose the neighbourhood restriction to only those schools that are built on Delhi Development Authority land.
The notification accorded priority to students living within a radius of one km from the school concerned. In case the seats remain vacant, those living within a distance of 3 km will get the chance for admission.
There are 1,400 private unaided schools in the capital, of which 298 are built on land allotted by the DDA.
The court’s judgement came on petitions filed by two school bodies — the Action Committee of Unaided Recognised Private Schools and Forum for Promotion of Quality Education along with a few parents to challenge the guidelines.
Earlier, the high court stayed the government’s nursery admission notification that made it mandatory for private unaided minority schools to admit students, in the unreserved category, on the basis of neighbourhood criteria.

source:newsx.com

January 21, 2017

HC stays govt’s notification of private minority unaided schools to accept neighbourhood criteria - Nursery Admissions Delhi 2017-18



Delhi High Court today stayed the operation of AAP government’s circular asking private unaided minority schools to accept admission forms based only on the neighbourhood or distance criteria, saying they are free to devise their own procedures and should be treated differently.
The bench, which has rapped the AAP government for issuing such notification “at the eleventh hour putting everyone in a chaos like situation”, said the government in future should make an endeavour to frame such policy at least six months in advance, if not earlier.
“Prima facie the Delhi government notification dated January 7, 2017 is contrary to the constitutional mandate. This court is of the view that fundamental right of minority schools cannot be interfered with and their right to admit students cannot be taken away.
“Minority schools have the right of maximum administration which cannot be taken away by any terms of contract,” Justice Manmohan said.
Pointing to the apex court verdicts safeguarding the rights available to minority-run institutions under the Constitution, the high court said, “treat them differently and the right to administer a minority school also contains the right to devise procedures for admission as long as they (procedures) are fair and transparent”.
Granting interim relief to schools, it said, “keeping in view the decision of the Supreme Court and this court, such schools are entitled to admit students according to their own procedures as long as they are fair and transparent and accordingly the impugned notification (of January 7, 2017) is stayed till further order of this court.”
The court has now fixed the main petition for further hearing on March 21 by when it has asked Delhi government to file their affidavit. The court was hearing a batch of petitions by some private unaided minority schools challenging the notification issued by the Delhi government.
Yesterday, Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Sanjay Jain, appearing for the Directorate of Education (DoE), had told the court that they have left it open for minority schools to decide on admitting students, adding that “after admitting the minority students, whatever seats are left, on that we want them to apply the neighbourhood criteria”.
The Delhi government had earlier said the distance criteria was a “priority gradation system” where first preference would be given to children within 1 km, then 1-3 km and then, if there was vacancy, to beyond 6 kms.

source: www.indianexpress.com/

January 15, 2017

Delhi High Court allows private schools to upload their own admissions criteria - Nursery Admissions Delhi 2017-18


The schedule for submitting applications for nursery admission is going to remain unchanged with the Delhi high court on Friday allowing private schools to upload their own admissions criteria and issue forms for now. The bench of justice Manmohan on Friday directed that the forms being issued by the private schools will also include the “distance from the school” where parents will have to mark whether their residence is less than 3 km, 3-6 km or over 6 km from the school.
The court held that since the scrutiny of forms for admissions is scheduled to take place after January 31, the final decision on whether to issue a stay order on the Delhi Government’s January 7 order making “distance” the primary criteria for admissions, will be taken before that date.
The court will now hear the matter further on January 19. In the interim, the bench has allowed schools to continue to application process.
The January 7 guidelines state the schools “shall not refuse admission to the residents of the locality”. Defining what neighbourhood would mean, the guidelines state that students who are residing within 1 km of the school will be preferred and if seats are not filled, preference will be given to students residing within 1-3 km of the school.
During the hearing on Friday afternoon, the bench of Justice Manmohan also pulled up the government for the late notification, commenting that due to the delay by government, the high court was “made a villain” since it was “forced” to consider the admissions criteria every year.
On Thursday, the bench had asked the government why the admissions guidelines could not have been issued at least 6 months before the date when the admission process was opened.

source: www.indianexpress.com/


January 5, 2017

Some Private Schools Start The Process, Others Waiting For Government Guidelines : Delhi Nursery Admissions 2017-18




Nursery admission in Delhi schools started on January 2 and the parents are still facing troubles with choosing schools for their children. Plenty of complaints have been reported after Delhi nursery admissions kicked off in the beginning of this week. Most prominent among them is the confusion over 298 schools in the capital city. After Delhi Directorate of Education (DoE) notified that schools on public land of Delhi Development Land (DDA) will have new guidelines for nursery admissions, so far, the only thing happened in that front is the meeting between school authorities and the Directorate of Education.

According to reports, those who have attended the meeting informed the government authorities their concerns regarding having two sets of standards for schools in the capital. 
Though there was no common admission guidelines published after the meetings, some private schools in the capital have already started admission procedure. 

Some schools are waiting for the government guidelines to come regarding the criteria and they have informed the parents about this, Red Roses Public School is one of them. "Pre-School admission for the session 2017-18 has been stopped till further guidelines from Directorate of Education", Red Roses Public School has said in a notice published in their website. 

Amidst all this confusion, parents are worried. Their major concern is; what will happen if they wait for the new guidelines and its aftermath. For the past few years Nursery admissions in Delhi have seen many controversies, with parents taking schools and the government to court over changing rules and guidelines several times. 

Meanwhile there were reports suggesting that the Delhi government is planning to do away with the management quota in the nursery admissions. If that happens, the schools and parents may again will be dragged into the court procedures as happened last year in which the schools procured a stay on Delhi government's decision to end the management quota in school admissions.

According to the education department's notification, admission forms were available from January 2 and the last date to submit applications is January 23. 

The first list of selected candidates, including those waitlisted, along with marks allotted under the point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31.

source: www.ndtv.com/

December 20, 2016

Nursery Admissions Delhi (2017-2018) - All you need to know about new circular/order issued on 19th Dec 2016

Fear is the mind-killer! So lets all understand what this new order is all about.
New DOE Delhi order dated 19th Dec 2016 issued for Nursery Admissions in Delhi for session 2017-2018 is bit confusing, and here I have simplified this for you in 3 simple steps -




Step I) This new circular is applicable only for -
  1. Families that do NOT belong to Economically Weaker Section (EWS) or Disadvantaged Group (DG) categories
  2. Only for admissions to Private, Unaided and Recognized Schools of Delhi
  3. Nursery Admissions in Delhi for session 2017-2018
  4. Schools that are NOT constructed on DDA land (there are 285 schools in Delhi that are on DDA land)
  5. Schools that are NOT run by government
Step II) In short - 
  1. SOME GOOD NEWS! - This order is NOT applicable for about 50% of the "well-known" schools of Delhi as they are constructed on DDA land (Yes!), these schools (total 285 of them) must admit 75% of students from neighborhood. Detailed guidelines will be released by DOE in coming days.
  2. MORE GOOD NEWS! - This order is applicable for all other Private Schools of Delhi, and most of those are either Small-Mid sized Private Schools, or they are one of those 5-7 star category schools of Delhi that have their own land.
Step III) Bit of BAD news. We all make mistakes, every system has loopholes, so does this order (that has mistakes and loopholes)

Point#7 in the order refers to DOE order issued on 06-01-2016 (No. F.DE.15/Act-l/4607/l3/2015/5686-5696), which states that schools shall not adopt criteria abolished in that old order, the problem is that the original list had 62 criteria, but new order has restricted use of 51 criteria hence leaving open several disputed ones, here are few criteria that schools may use to their advantage -
  • Points for management quota - old order leaves room for this by stating "However, if required, the children of the staff and the children of the members of the Management Committee can be given admission by making it a criterion and assigning points"
  • Special ground (parents with proficiency in specific areas of art etc)
  • First child
  • School transport users
Although there would only be 25% seats that schools can fiddle with, and we hope DOE fixes this loophole to ensure admission process is fair ever.

Here is the admission schedule as published in the order :
               Source: http://www.edudel.nic.in/

The DOE will issue another set of guidelines and schedule for schools on DDA land

Nursery Admissions Delhi 2017-18



In a first, the Directorate of Education will issue two sets of guidelines for admission into nursery of private schools - one for schools on public land, another for the rest.

Late on Monday, DoE issued guidelines for the second lot. For schools on private land, the nursery process begins on January 2; admission criteria will be uploaded online and submitted to DoE the day before.
Application forms will be available from January 2 and parents will have time till January 23 to submit. Details for children competing for "open" -unreserved -seats, will have to be filled in by January 31 and the tally of points (out of hundred) for each child will be uploaded by February 6.]The first list of selected candidates and the waiting list will be posted on February 15.
In another first, the DoE has allowed a three-day window -from February 16 to 18 -for "resolution of queries of parents...regarding allotment of points to their ward in the first list." All details -full list of criteria and points allotted to each parameter -will be available on the DoE's website. The second list should be out by February 28 and the process, if all goes to plan, should be over by March 31, 2017.

But things may not be as simple. Monday's "guidelines and schedule are not applicable for the schools running on the land allotted by DDA on the condition that "the school shall not refuse admission to the resident of the locality" or "the society shall undertake to admit 75% of the students of the neighbourhood or from the locality in which the school is located"." The DoE will issue another set of guidelines and, possibly, a different schedule for this lot of schools -285 as per the attached, "tentative" list. These may constitute a fraction of the total number of private unaided schools - about 1,700 - but some of these invite the fiercest competition. The appended list includes several DAVs, Delhi Public Schools, Bal Bhartis, Heritages and also Vasant Valley and Ahlcon International. The issue of criteria for this lot is in court. Admissions into the 25% EWSDG (economically weaker section/disadvantaged categories) seats will be handled by the DoE directly. There should be third list of instructions for that.

source: www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/


For 285 schools built on DDA Land, there will be separate schedule and guidelines






Nursery Admissions for the session 2017-18 will begin from January 2,2017 in around 1400 private unaided recognised schools in the capital. But it does not cover the 285 schools built on DDA Land. There will be separate guidelines and schedule for these 285 schools.





According to the notification, guidelines for these schools will be declared later. These 285 schools comprise some of the most well-known institutions in the city.

For the remaining schools, the guidelines remain largely the same as last year. Criteria such as distance from school, parents as alumni, sibling in the same school, girl child etc can be used and points can be ascribed to them as the school deems fit.

Unfair criteria — such as giving points if the applicant’s parents are well-educated, if the child is proficient in music, or if the parent is vegetarian — however, will not be allowed. Management quota will be allowed but will be capped at a maximum of 20 per cent.

The difference this year, however, is that schools will have to reserve two days to resolve parents’ grievances, if any, after the declaration of the first admission list.

The guidelines released Monday flowed from the legal battle fought last year. The Delhi government had come out with a strict guideline where it did away with the management quota and defined the basis on which points could be given. Schools went to court over the matter and won. They were allowed to frame their own guidelines provided they were fair, non-discriminatory, and did not violate Right to Education Act.

The cost of one form is capped at Rs 25. Parents will not be forced to buy school prospectus. All schools will have to reserve 25 per cent of their seats for students from the economically weaker section. These admissions will be carried out by a centralized online application system.

source: www.indianexpress.com/

Nursery admissions to begin from Jan 2 in 1,400 Delhi schools


Nursery admissions will begin from January 2, 2017, in around 1,400 private unaided recognized schools in the capital for the next academic session but this announcement does not cover the 285 schools build on DDA land as there will be separate guidelines and schedule for them.

The Directorate of Education (DOE) on Monday announced the admission schedule for around 1,400 schools, out of the total 1,700 schools. Admission forms will be available from January 2 and the last date of submission of application forms is January 23, officials said.

These schools will be free to decide the criteria and its points for admission but they will have to steer clear from a list of 51 criterions, which the government had abolished last year.

The abolished criteria include, parent’s education, parent’s profession, age, oral test and interview.

“The admission process for general category seats will begin from January 2. Schools can decide pointers for the criteria but they cannot adopt 51 listed criteria that have been abolished by the government,” officials said.

DOE said that separate guidelines and schedule for 285 schools on DDA land given on lease condition will be announced later. The government had earlier announced that schools build on DDA land will have to follow only the distance criterion.

“The above guidelines and schedule is not applicable for the schools running on the land allotted by DDA on the condition that ‘the school shall not refuse admission to the resident of the locality’ or ‘the society shall undertake to admit 75% of the students of the neighbourhood or from the locality in which the school is located’,” DOE said on Monday.

The first list of selected candidates, including the wait list candidates, along with marks allotted under point system, will be announced by schools on February 15. After the first list is out, the parents can get their doubts resolved about allocation of points or any other queries related to the admission procedure for three days, i.e. February 16, 17, and 18.

“The second list, if any, will come out on February 29 and the admission process will close on March 31,” DOE said in its notification.


DOE said that the minimum age should be 3 years by March 31 of the year in which admission is being sought. It also said that the number of seats at the entry level shall not be less than the highest number of seats in entry level classes during last three years.


The documents that can be considered as proof of residence of parents are, ration card issued in the name of parents, domicile certificate of child or his/her parents, voter ID card of any of the parent.

AT A GLANCE

1. School to upload criteria and their points on DOE wesbite: Jan 1

2. Application forms to be available: Jan 2

3. Last date of submission of application forms: Jan 23

4. Schools to upload marks (as per point system) given to each applicant: Feb 6

5. Schools to announce first list of selected candidates: Feb 15

6. Schools to announce second list of selected candidates: Feb 29

7. Closure of admission Process: March 31







source: www.hindustantimes.com/














December 9, 2015

Nursery admissions in Delhi to begin from January 1, 2016...there are no changes in the process...

Nursery admissions will begin from January 1, 2016 and there are no changes in the process. 


Nursery entries to start from Jan 1 in Delhi

In the education minister's own words, "There are basically two new changes to ensure transparency in nursery admission - list of applicants and list of admitted/waitlisted [candidates] along with marks will be given." Many schools were making such lists and scores public already. 

Manish Sisodia tweeted on Tuesday evening that the schedule will be issued. The process for admissions into the 25% EWS/DG (economically weaker section/ disadvantaged groups) categories will be announced separately. The announcement was made through Twitter and there was no notification on the directorate's website. 

Last year's process will be followed because "the amendments to the Delhi School Education Act 1973 that the Delhi government passed in the winter session of the assembly are yet to be approved by the Centre," explains director, education, Padmini Singla, "But the process has to begin." 

On Tuesday evening Sisodia announced on Twitter, "Admission schedule for entry level classes for open seats in private schools issued today. Process to start on 1st Jan 2016." He further said, "Schools have to declare admission criteria which shall be well defined, non-discriminatory, unambiguous and transparent; criteria along with the points for each and total number of seats to be displayed on flex board at entry gate of school; all the schools shall upload details of applicant students and marks allotted to each of them based on criteria on website; number of seats at entry level in each school shall not be less than the highest number of seats during last three year; and all the schools shall also upload details of children admitted and waitlisted and marks allotted to them under their system." 

"What is new about this? This has been on from 2012. Also, separating the process for EWS and general category is illegal," says lawyer-activist Khagesh Jha.

source: TOI

December 4, 2015

AAP’s Delhi education policy rings alarm bells.....

The Delhi government’s proposal to amend a provision of the Delhi School Education (DSE) Act, 1973, and the enactment of the Delhi School (Verification of Accounts and Refund of Excess Fee) Bill, 2015, may create trouble for the ruling Aam Aadmi Party (AAP). Agitated private school teachers and Right to Education (RTE) activists are planning to battle the change through massive protests.
The DSE (Amendment) Bill, 2015, tabled in the Assembly by Human Resources Development Minister Manish Sisodia on 20 November proposes to delete Section 10 (1) of the Act, which guarantees that the employees of recognised private schools get salaries and other benefits equal to their counterparts at government schools.
Educationists and RTE raise serious concerns.
“The proposed amendment completely takes away the right to pay parity of all the employees of recognised private schools guaranteed by Section 10(1) of the DSE Act, 1973, which mandates that pay and other benefits of the employees of a recognised private school shall not be less than those paid to their counterparts working in government schools.
“On the basis of this provision of the law, all employees of recognised private schools are legally entitled to claim benefits under the Central Pay Commission revised from time to time. If this proposed amendment is passed, no employee would be entitled to claim benefits of pay and emoluments under the Seventh Pay Commission that will come into force with effect from 1 January 2016,” advocate Ashok Agarwal, who is also the president of All-India Parents Association, told Firstpost.
The 42-year-old provision, he said, that was achieved after a long struggle has been taken away by the AAP government in one stroke through the proposed amendment bill. “The people of Delhi voted (Chief Minister) Arvind Kejriwal’s party to power for protection of the workers’ rights and not to snatch them, and that too in the manner it is being done. Even the previous Congress and BJP governments in the state did not ever think of or attempt to take away such a valuable right of equal pay and dignified livelihood,” he said alleging that “this apparently has been done at the behest of the private school managements lobby”.
Reminded that the government argues that it has done so because it has “no intention of infringing on the autonomy of private schools,” Agarwal reacted strongly saying that “You (the government) are state, not a private body. You have a duty to check commercialisation and exploitation”.
“Handsome salary is directly linked to quality education. You are defeating the very objection for which you have been established,” he said.
But what are the consequences of dropping Section 10(1) of the DSE Act, 1973?
“A teacher is not a workman either under the Industrial Dispute Act, 1947 or the Minimum Wages Act, 1948. Therefore, there is no protection of their service. They cannot even claim minimum wage as a matter of right. Hence, once the amendment bill is passed in the assembly, their status would be reduced to a domestic servant because there is every possibility of reduction of their salaries on some excuse and court may not be of any help,” he explained.
Shantha Sinha, member of India Campaign for Education, a national forum that is opposing the amendments proposed by the Delhi government, said, “The proposed amendment bill will adversely impact the dignity of teachers. They are as qualified as other professionals such as doctors, engineers and lawyers.”
Warning the government that it will have to face stiff resistance from the people of the city if it goes ahead with the proposed amendment, a teacher said on condition of anonymity, “Arvind Kejriwal has played a cruel fraud with thousands of innocent teachers and other staff of recognised private schools by snatching from them the right to pay parity with their counterparts in government schools.”
Saddened with the government’s move, another lay teacher said, “This is the only dignified profession for women. With the deletion of the section, our salary would be reduced. How will we manage all expenses?”
source: firstpost.com

December 3, 2015

AAP govt plans action against nursery admission interviews, donations....

The AAP government has decided to crack down on private schools in Delhi flouting admission rules and charging under-the-counter fees, a move aimed at cleaning up the city’s education system plagued by rampant corruption and mismanagement.
Stiff penalties are in the offing. According to the proposal, any institute demanding a donation or capitation fee in any form would be fined ten times the amount charged, or Rs 5 lakh, whichever is higher.
If a school breaks rules by interviewing children or their parents for nursery admissions, it would have to pay Rs 5 lakh for a first offence and Rs 10 lakh for each subsequent violation.
The government, which hiked its budget allocation for education by 106% this year, is planning a major overhaul of the school education system. The changes will be introduced by amending the Delhi School Education Act and Delhi School Education Rules 1973.
These modifications are likely to be cleared in the assembly session beginning on Wednesday as the ruling party has 67 of the total 70 legislators.
Once the bill for education reforms is approved in Delhi assembly, it would be sent to the Centre. Changes are likely to be implemented in the next academic session starting April 2016.
The AAP government, which rode to power this February on promises of corruption-free governance, is also drafting a law under which a committee headed by a retired judge would monitor school fee hikes and about 400-500 authorised chartered accountants would scrutinise the accounts of these institutes.
“If the schools are found siphoning fee money to other accounts or making fake bills, they could face imprisonment. The penalties and jail term will be decided soon,” said chief minister Arvind Kejriwal.
“The committee will have the power to ask schools to refund the excess money and will prescribe the fee for the next year. Also, there will be penal provision against the school and the management amounting to criminal prosecution and fine.”
After Rajasthan, Delhi too is mulling a law to end the no-detention policy in schools which came with the Right to Education. The government has yet to decide whether the policy will be restricted till Class 3 or 5.
“We are committed to improve the education in government schools, but there are also several complaints with private schools. So we are bringing in changes and will take action against those schools charging capitation fee either in cash or kind,” said Kejriwal.
Admissions for students from the economically weaker sections, for whom every school reserves 25% of its seats as mandated by the RTE Act, will now go online and become centralised.
During the admission process, the government, and not schools, would conduct the draw of lots to decide which students get picked.
There are plans to amend the Delhi School Education Rules, 1973, and withdraw a clause that says private schools should pay their teachers fees equivalent to government school teachers.
In the new arrangement, salaries of teachers in private schools will be fixed as per the minimum wages, and the government will decide on the proportion that is to be paid.
Delhi’s directorate of education (DoE) would also get more teeth. If a school does not comply with an order, the DoE would be able to take over the management or de-recognise it.
source: HT

Nursery admission rules in the Capital could change this year again....

Education minister Manish Sisodia confirmed that a law to bring in new guidelines would be introduced in the assembly session starting November 18
The “neighbourhood” criterion could be enough for three-year-olds to enroll in nursery class as the AAP government might chuck out all other norms with an aim to simplify the process — dubbed an annual headache for parents.
Education minister Manish Sisodia confirmed that a law to bring in new guidelines would be introduced in the assembly session starting November 18. “The new law will streamline the nursery admission process in the city.”
As part of the simplification exercise, a source said, a plan is being worked out to keep only the neighbourhood criterion or distance from home to school for a child seeking admission — the closer the better.
“This means, even general category students will be selected through draw of lots which is currently done for children from economically weaker sections of society for whom 25% seats are reserved under the right to education.”
The controversy-prone nursery admission process in Delhi, which normally starts in December, has undergone several changes in the past as the authorities looked for ways to make things easier.
In 2013, lieutenant governor Najeeb Jung issued a set of guidelines that reserved 70 points for children applying for admission in a “neighbourhood” school. Admissions were given to those living within a 6km radius of the school. The following year, the rule varied from school to school — from 3km to 6km.
“The neighbourhood norm is undoubtedly good because it agrees with the right to education. It will save children the hassle of travelling miles to reach school. It is not discriminatory and every child will be treated equally,” said Ashok Aggarwal, a lawyer and founder of Social Jurist, an NGO that works in the field of education.
It filed a court petition seeking a ban on interviews in 2004 and later sought scrapping of the point system when right to education was enforced in 2010. A source in the education department said the management quota, which allows 20% seats to be reserved for school authorities and children of staff, could also be junked.
Besides state-run schools, the rules are meant to regulate admissions to entry-level classes in private recognised institutions as well.
Source: HT